Tuesday, 9 August 2011

Supermarine Spitfire


In June 1940, the German Army had brought the rest of Europe to its knees. ‘Hitler knows that he will have to break us in this island or lose the war. If we can stand up to him, all Europe may be free and the life of the world will move forward into broad, sunlit uplands,’ said Churchill. The future of Europe depended on Britain. A self-confident Herman Göring thought that it would be only a matter of weeks before his planes had forced Britain to surrender. The courage, resourcefulness and brilliant organisation of the RAF were to prove him wrong. By late September 1940, the RAF had proved invincible, thanks to the Vickers Supermarine Spitfire. It exceeded anything that any other air force possessed. RJ Mitchell, a shy and almost painfully modest engineer, was the genius behind the Spitfire. On the 5th March 1936, following its successful maiden flight, a legend was born.


Aircraft Type:
Supermarine Spitfire
Mark:
Mk.VC
Mk 1a, Mk IIa, Mk IIb, Mk Va (some hooked), Mk Vb (half hooked), Mk Vc, Mk VIII, Mk PR.XIII, Mk L.Vb, Mk LF.Vb, F.Vb, Mk XI, Mk
HF.IX, XII, XVI, Seafire Mk IIb prototype
Primary Role:
shore-based fighter, carrier borne fighter
First Flight: 
Prototype 5.3.1936 (Mk.IA)
Manufacturer:
Supermarine
Engine:
One 1,440 hp Rolls-Royce Merlin 45 engine
 Wing Span: Length:
Height:  
Wingspan 36.8 ft (11.23 m)
Length 29.9 ft (9.12 m)
Height 11.4 ft (3.48 m) 
Empty Weight: Max.Weight:
Weight empty  5,100 lb (2,313 kg)
max.  6,786 lb (3,078 kg)
Speed: 
Ceiling: 
Range:
Speed 374 mph (602 km/h)
Ceiling 37,000 ft (11,280 m)
Range  470 mi (756 k)m
Armament: 
Two 20mm cannons and two .50 calibre machine guns in wings
Two 250-lb bombs plus one 500-lb bomb on center line
Crew:
1
Squadrons:
718,719,736,748,759,761,762,768,770,775,778,787,790,791,794,798
801,808,809,879,880,884,885,886,887,897,899
Battle honours:

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